Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Plants

From the Archives of 2001 and 2002


March 15, 2010

Not having any new photographs to show, I went through my photographs of 2001 and 2002 today hoping to find something shareworthy. I found only one from 2001 (the turkey-tail fungus) and 14 from 2002. It was frustrating to see many photographs that might have been good if only I’d framed them better. Even more photographs were images of interesting things rather than interesting images of things. Ah, well, photograph and learn. These were all taken with a Sony Cybershot DSC-F707. You may have seen some of them in earlier blog posts.

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More Wandering around Downtown Oberlin, February 2020


February 16, 2020

Last Sunday I wandered around downtown Oberlin again. Four of the photographs in today’s post are variations on ones I’d taken during previous downtown wanderings. It’s fun for me to compare the new with the old photos, and on the chance it might be fun for you, I’ve included the old ones here.

1 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken last Sunday

2 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken April 30, 2017

3 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken last Sunday

4 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken May 29, 2017

5 I wonder how many of you are able to identify this nicely rusted object.

6 Backside of storefronts, photo taken last Sunday

7 Backside of storefronts, photo taken April 30, 2017

8 Alley still life, photo taken last Sunday

8 Alley still life, photo taken November 21, 2018

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10 Tree shadows on old painted wall sign, photo taken last Sunday

11 Tree and old painted wall sign, photo taken May 5, 2018

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Oberlin in Sunshine


January 5, 2020

Two days before I photographed Oberlin in fog, I was happily running around my neighborhood photographing Oberlin in sunshine. In my memory there is not much sunshine in Oberlin winters, and I wanted to seize the day—especially because it had been cold enough for ice to form on the ponds.

1 What photographer can ignore an S-curve? I wonder if the curve here has to do with the varying depth of water in the pond.

2 The black things are almost-holes in the ice. Can someone tell me—or guess—how they form?

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5 Are bubbles in the ice caused by decaying vegetation beneath that is releasing methane? Or maybe living plants that are releasing oxygen?

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7 Sycamores always stand out, especially against a blue sky.

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12 The woods were aglow with leaf lights.

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Cape Cod in September 2019


November 29, 2019

My friend Lynda invited me to visit her in Falmouth, Massachusetts, this September. We are both photographers, and she took me places where we could enjoy nature with our cameras. All but the last photograph in this post—which I took in Woods Hole—are from Falmouth and environs.

Update of December 4, 2019

A niece of a friend found the lichens shown in #18 on the Bigelow Building at 98 Water Street, just around the corner from the Aquarium. (I had not taken the time to note the exact location.) “Bigelow,” my friend says, “was constructed in 1930, the first building erected for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution that was established in the same year. There are older brick buildings (and walls and gravestones) in Woods Hole but the north side of Bigelow may be particularly favorable for growth because north walls do not receive direct sunlight nor most of the prevailing winds, which would dry them out.”

You may think you’ve seen this photo before. I just love the look of light at the end of a tunnel and have taken many similar photographs.

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3 There are so many varieties of goldenrod. I don’t know which one this is, but it was growing in a wooded area.

4 This is another kind of goldenrod, punctuated by iron weed.

5 My resident botanist says this is a composite he’s not familiar with. He says it doesn’t grow in Ohio. (I thought it looked just like one of our Ohio wildflowers.)

6 Until I saw them growing wild on Cape Cod, I’d only ever seen porcelain berries as cultivated nursery plants.

7 These wild rose hips were the size of small apples. The wild rose hips I’ve seen in northern Ohio are no bigger than the size of peas.

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11 These rocks are remnants of an old wall.

12 Here’s a new rock wall.

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15 This and the rocks in the following photographs were beside the park trail, not part of a wall.

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18 As other photos in this post also show, lichens like Cape Cod.


Walking Downriver in September—3


November 19, 2019

Yes I always look for Leptothrix discophora when I’m at the river (see Sunday’s post), and yes our destination was the waterfall (see Monday’s post). But along the way many other things caught my eye. Here is a sampling. You’ll notice that I have a thing for rocks.

1 I don’t know what made those yellow-ish marks on the riverbed. Maybe it’s where mudstone is showing through algae that was scuffed up by a crayfish. Except that mudstone is grey—at least all the mudstone I’ve seen is.

2 I love seeing plants growing on other plants—even on dead ones. Logs that harbor other growth are called nurse logs. Isn’t that cool?

3 Many cliffs along the Vermilion River show where the earth has been formed or deformed over the eons—layers bent or upended. The white stripes are limestone layers in the shale that hold broken stalks of crinoid fossils.

The shale shore fractures in such interesting shapes. You’d think this is poured cement.

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6 We have glacial erratics all over Ohio. They are especially visible in and along river beds.

7 Along one section of the river, rocks were patterned with white lichens. At least I think these are lichens.

8 This plant, bedded down in the moss covering a rock, will have a short life. But what a pretty one.


A Few Garden Finds


October 21, 2019

Here are a few photographs taken in August at the Olbrich Botanical Garden in Madison, Wisconsin.

1 The red splashes are cardinal flowers, Lobelia cardinalis.

2 Here is a birch—I don’t presume to know which one.

3 Here’s another birch, overlooking two inviting chairs.

4 I’m not sure why I’m drawn to empty chairs. Maybe they represent possibilities . . .

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Revisiting Table Rock


May 22, 2019

Last April I posted three photographs of a rock I see whenever I go to the Schoepfle Garden. In the Comments, Alan Goldsmith asked if I’d thought of photographing the rock from the same place every time. I confess that I’d only been trying to find the most interesting composition each time. But his comment lodged in my brain, and I have since tried to stick with the same view or two when I visit. So here are two photographs I took of the rock Saturday. Following those are some photos I’d taken of the rock from the same vantage points on June 2 and July 14, 2018.

Shortly after posting photos of this rock last April, I named the rock Table Rock. Now I can keyword this specific rock in Lightroom and call up its photos easily. But there’s another advantage in naming features in the landscape. For me, attaching words increases the intimacy I feel with the named thing. I can’t say why this is so. Perhaps some of you have some relevant ideas.

 

 

 

 


A Walk along Myakkahatchee Creek


April 21, 2019

This collection of photographs begins, in a way, where the last post left off: with trees of life. The plants growing on these trees seem a little different from the ones shown in the last post—perhaps because they immediately border the water. Two photographs separate the trees of life from reflections in the creek: one I think of as essence of tiger—a small stream on its way to the creek—and an arrangement of dead leaves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mossy Logs in the Woods


August 18, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 4


August 17, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 3


August 16, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 2


August 15, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 1


August 14, 2018


Hoses in Poses, Continued 4


July 21, 2018


Reaching


July 13, 2018


Vetch in the Grass


June 25, 2018

If you thought this photo was of an old alfalfa field (because that was the original title to this post), you are to be forgiven. My biologist husband just informed me that these purple flowers (and plant) are vetch. My apologies.


Someone Else’s Begonia 3


June 16, 2018


Someone Else’s Begonia 1 and 2


June 15, 2018

 

 

 


Old Cattails, New Duck Weed


June 14, 2018


Into the Woods 13


June 8, 2018


Into the Woods 12


June 7, 2018


Into the Woods 11


June 6, 2018


Into the Woods 5


May 31, 2018

I know this as a coral fungus, but it has fancier names.


Into the Woods 4


May 30, 2018