Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Trees

Close to Home 3


April 26, 2020

A few days ago I walked over to our grounds-keeping area. In the almost-four years I’ve lived in this community, I’d never done that. The natural areas also called to me.

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Close to Home 2


April 12, 2020

Since the post of March 29, I have taken many more walks around the grounds where I live. It’s getting a little harder to find something new to photograph. I’ll need to focus on new ways to photograph familiar things. The last two photos—the very last is a close crop of the previous image—were taken out our back window.

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More Wandering around Downtown Oberlin, February 2020


February 16, 2020

Last Sunday I wandered around downtown Oberlin again. Four of the photographs in today’s post are variations on ones I’d taken during previous downtown wanderings. It’s fun for me to compare the new with the old photos, and on the chance it might be fun for you, I’ve included the old ones here.

1 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken last Sunday

2 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken April 30, 2017

3 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken last Sunday

4 The old ticket booth of the Apollo Theater, photo taken May 29, 2017

5 I wonder how many of you are able to identify this nicely rusted object.

6 Backside of storefronts, photo taken last Sunday

7 Backside of storefronts, photo taken April 30, 2017

8 Alley still life, photo taken last Sunday

8 Alley still life, photo taken November 21, 2018

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10 Tree shadows on old painted wall sign, photo taken last Sunday

11 Tree and old painted wall sign, photo taken May 5, 2018

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Disappointment at Mill Hollow Bacon Woods Park


January 19, 2020

We locals just call it Mill Hollow, but where I went with my new friend Rebecca two weeks ago is officially called Mill Hollow Bacon Woods Park. It was another toe-freezing day, and perhaps if I hadn’t felt physically uncomfortable, I’d have seen more. But as you’ll find out if you read the words below the last few photographs below, there was another reason to be disappointed.

1 Now this was fun—seeing evidence of three kinds of precipitation throughout our walk.

2 And this old dead tree kept both of us fascinated for quite some time.

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6 Another dead tree made me think of Chinese scroll paintings of mountains and trees.

7 And I enjoyed seeing the verticality of the woods interrupted by twisting wild-grape vines.

8 But in a landscape colored mostly like this . . .

9 . . . it was a special treat to see rows and rows of large red hedges.

10 They were even along a temporary pond whose water I’m sure was colored by iron deposits precipitated by the iron bacteria.

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13 Alas, as I found out later from my botanist husband, this beauty belongs to the rampantly invasive Japanese knotweed. Enjoyment cancelled.


Oberlin in Sunshine


January 5, 2020

Two days before I photographed Oberlin in fog, I was happily running around my neighborhood photographing Oberlin in sunshine. In my memory there is not much sunshine in Oberlin winters, and I wanted to seize the day—especially because it had been cold enough for ice to form on the ponds.

1 What photographer can ignore an S-curve? I wonder if the curve here has to do with the varying depth of water in the pond.

2 The black things are almost-holes in the ice. Can someone tell me—or guess—how they form?

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5 Are bubbles in the ice caused by decaying vegetation beneath that is releasing methane? Or maybe living plants that are releasing oxygen?

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7 Sycamores always stand out, especially against a blue sky.

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12 The woods were aglow with leaf lights.

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A Sunny December Day at Schoepfle Garden


December 15, 2019

It was cold, but the sun was shining when I went back to Schoepfle Garden last Sunday morning. My toes felt frozen by the time I turned toward home, but I had had a delightful time poking around the garden. It was fun to photograph ice; I’m usually in warmer climes at this time of the year and don’t see much of it. The color of the river was unusual, clear at the margins, murky green toward the middle, and in some places blue, reflecting sky.

1 Sycamores like to grow right on the edges of the river.

2 Another, older, sycamore: I was taken by how fiercely it clung to the shore.

3 Day-lily leaves die so gracefully—

4 as do some palm fronds (photographed in Florida in February).

The shale shoreline always gets to me. Here is it graced by leaves, mostly oak, and what I think is frozen foam.

6 These water-lily leaves in the Front Pond were surrounded by ice that was freezing in interesting ways.

7 Ice was forming in similar patterns in other parts of the garden. This is water in what I call the Peace Pool.

8 The water flow was so slow that ice even formed on the edges of the river.

9 Water, now frozen, filled a groove in the shale shore at one of my favorite spots.

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Walking Downriver in September—2


November 18, 2019

This post—a continuation of yesterday’s—is about the waterfall David and I visit when we walk downriver in northern Ohio’s Vermilion River, which we do most Septembers.

Update of November 22, 2019: In the Comments section, Steve Gingold asked if I’d thought of stitching together photographs 6 and 7. Look below photograph 7 to see how that worked.

This photograph is from August 2006. I had heard about a waterfall not far from Schoepfle Garden that could be accessed from the river. Here is my first view of it. As pretty as this small waterfall was, I was a little disappointed.

2 David thought there might be more, so he clambered up the cliff to have a look.

3 This year, when I saw the base of the cliff, I was not disappointed because I knew what was coming.

4 I could happily linger here.

5 This was our destination. From the top of the cliff to the pool, the water falls about 20 feet. It’s not spectacular as waterfalls go, but it counts as a real waterfall to me.

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6 and 7 stitched together in Photoshop, per Steve Gingold’s suggestion. It almost works.

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Playing with the October Landscape at Schoepfle Garden


November 10, 2019

Fall color was past its prime by the time I got out to Schoepfle Garden October 29. Still, some lovely remnants remained. Besides photographing them as is, I played around with intentional camera movement (ICM) again. That I took the fourth photo here is thanks to Steve Schwartzman, who asked in the comments section of the last post, “In any of these, did you zoom your lens while you moved the camera?” I had not, but at Steve’s prompt, I tried it on this trip. Will try it again. What fun.

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Playing with the Wisconsin Landscape


October 27, 2019

To close out the photographs taken in Wisconsin this summer, here are four experiments in intentional camera movement (ICM). That is, the first four are Wisconsin; the others, from the archives, are Ohio and Florida.

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Cucumber Falls 6


July 28, 2019

Last week I spent another glorious time at my friend’s farmstead in Pennsylvania. Repeating what we had done in previous years, we went on two outings to the Youghiogheny River—to Cucumber Falls one day and Ohiopyle Falls another. Looking at last year’s photos of Cucumber Falls, I see that the same views appealed to me this year. Rather than post nearly exact repetitions, I refer you to this and this and this and this and this post from 2018. Below are some photographs of and around Cucumber Falls that don’t repeat last year’s catch, at least not much.

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Taking a Stroll around the Grounds


June 16, 2019

Yesterday I followed and unfollowed paths around my immediate neighborhood. I found baby oak leaves overlooking tall grasses; a willow tree behind goldenrod plants and before cattails sprinkled with pseudacris; a path through a wooded area dotted with daisies; very young films of Leptothrix discophora, some in front of a small outcrop of sedge; a duckweed-covered pond rising to meet hanging branches of another oak tree; and more duckweed in a different pond in the rain. I also took another stab at Intentional Camera Movement.

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Except When I Do


May 28, 2019

Many of you know that I don’t photograph flowers—except when I do. Two photographs of flowers play bookends here to the rest of my haul from walking in Schoepfle Garden a week ago Saturday. In between are lichens on a low retaining wall and some favorite trees along the Vermilion River. Elsewhere in the park, I wasn’t surprised to see this stump; the tree had been visibly ailing. But I was surprised that someone had painted the edges of the stump with orange paint. Drawing closer, however, I saw that it wasn’t orange paint but a bright-orange fungus. None of my photographs of the fungus up close came out. I wonder if the brightness could have thrown off my camera’s focussing ability. Had I done more chimping, I might have noticed that the fungus was not in focus. Maybe I would even have thought to try manual focus. At least the section of the stump that is spalted turned out. The next photograph is in monotone because it was too confusing in color. Moving in, thus cutting down on the number of elements in the frame, the subject could handle color. I found some Leptothrix discophora along the river, but we’ve had so much rain that it was quite young (previous films having been washed down toward Lake Erie) and probably is all gone by now. Even though this film is very young, you know you’re looking at L. discophora when the water reflects the surrounding foliage so brilliantly. The opening flower photograph is of dogwood, but I don’t know the name of the closing flower. Maybe one or more of you do. The last image is a crop of the previous one. Click on it to see it larger.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Observing Beauty in Senescence


May 4, 2019

In February my friend Lynda and I went to Fort DeSoto Park, which is sort-of near St. Petersburg (the one in Florida). I was having a hard time finding something photograph-worthy until I gave into my fondness for dying and dead palm fronds. Then I couldn’t get enough of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


First Florida Foray of the Season


December 23, 2018

On December 8, shortly after arriving in Sarasota for the winter, I took my first trip to South Lido Park this season. This is perhaps my favorite park in the county, largely because it contains a variety of ecosystems.  The bonus is that it’s only about 15 minutes from home. On my first visit of the season there I always search with apprehension to see if a little stump I’ve named R2D2 is still standing. Every year, I think it has disappeared, only to realize it’s only further down the path. And so it went this year. R2D2 (in the first four photos) seems more colorful than it has been in the past, but that may be my imagination. The fifth photo is probably the first of others you’ll see over the next couple of months showing a dead sabal palm leaf, which I find more graceful in senescence than on the tree. The sixth photograph is another perennial favorite: backlit leaves of the seagrape bush. The last photograph shows my photographing friend Lynda and me.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mossy Logs in the Woods


August 18, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 4


August 17, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 2


August 15, 2018


Ferns in the Woods 1


August 14, 2018


Cucumber Falls 2


August 10, 2018

Strictly speaking, this photograph does not show the falls but the pooled and slowly moving water of Cucumber Run between the falls and the Youghiogheny River. The colors in the water are reflected trees and sky.


Sky Blue


July 24, 2018


Hesitating


July 12, 2018


The Mushroom Tree


June 13, 2018


Then Out of the Woods


June 9, 2018


Into the Woods 9


June 4, 2018