Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Latest

The Dumpsters of Sarasota 23 through 38


January 2, 2019

So many dumpster photographs, so little time. I’d rather not post all 16 of these photographs at once, but I am plagued by a surfeit of riches. The outing that produced these dumpster photographs resulted in many goodies, and I want to get through them all in a reasonable length of time. Feel free to quit looking at any point. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Florida Foray of the Season


December 23, 2018

On December 8, shortly after arriving in Sarasota for the winter, I took my first trip to South Lido Park this season. This is perhaps my favorite park in the county, largely because it contains a variety of ecosystems.  The bonus is that it’s only about 15 minutes from home. On my first visit of the season there I always search with apprehension to see if a little stump I’ve named R2D2 is still standing. Every year, I think it has disappeared, only to realize it’s only further down the path. And so it went this year. R2D2 (in the first four photos) seems more colorful than it has been in the past, but that may be my imagination. The fifth photo is probably the first of others you’ll see over the next couple of months showing a dead sabal palm leaf, which I find more graceful in senescence than on the tree. The sixth photograph is another perennial favorite: backlit leaves of the seagrape bush. The last photograph shows my photographing friend Lynda and me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Bank Drive-Through 21


December 13, 2018

When I went dumpster hunting last month (see the small haul), I stopped by the old bank drive-through that has entertained me so often. I’d never been there in freezing weather, and icy new appearances awaited me. The last three photographs are what I will enter into the FAVA Six-State Photography show early next year, hoping one will be juried in.

 

 

 

 

 

If You Go to Boston . . .


December 10, 2018

Because of the kindness of three people, I am privileged (along with 61 other photographers) to be exhibiting a photograph in the Passageway of the Lafayette City Center in Boston. The Passageway links Macy’s with the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The show, Abstraction Attraction, is up now through May 5, 2019. Note that you can see all the photographs online. If you happen to be in the Passageway during this time and see my photo, please let me know! The photographs were selected by Paula Tognarelli, executive director and curator of the Griffin Museum of Photography. Here’s the chosen photo, The Fish Bins of Cortez 38, and a link to other fish-bin photos. Big thanks to Stephen Tomasko, who sent me the entry information, and to my friends Katie Brown and Robert Taylor, who prompted Stephen by telling him that I “was a photographer, too.”

Should We or Should We Not?


November 23, 2018

Alan Goldsmith of Pixetera left a comment on my last post that deserves more attention. Here’s what he said about my photographs of oil-film-topped puddles in my drug store’s parking lot:

“[T]hey raise this question for me again: In making beautiful photos of environmental pollution and destruction, does the photographer sabotage his or her ecological message? Or, to put it another way: Should we make really ugly, awful pictures if we want to show the harmful effects of contaminants in our air, land, and water? Would anyone even look at them then?

“I have yet to hear a satisfactory answer to this dilemma.”

I have struggled with Alan’s question in presenting my photographs of dumpsters, and certainly the question pertains even more strongly to photographs of oil pollution. Recently I considered this issue in a short essay to go with some photographs of dumpsters for the 2018 Fall issue of Eureka!.*

Here are some new photographs of dumpsters, taken Wednesday. The first two are of a dumpster I have previously photographed. The last is a detail of the third photograph.

 

 

 

 

*Eureka! is a small literary magazine created by and for residents of Kendal at Oberlin, where I live.

Not Leptothrix discophora—Vintage or Otherwise


November 13, 2018

A week ago Friday I was in the parking lot of our nearby drug store, waiting for my passenger to finish her shopping. It’s boring just to wait for someone. Enter my iPhone! It had just finished raining. What lucky timing. These are not Leptothrix discophora films but thin films of oil or gasoline on the puddles, which is what L. discophora films are often taken for. You can see why. Both exhibit color interference, also called thin-film interference. These films—unlike films of L. discophora—have no fracturing. (Compare with images in the previous post.)

Fabian Oefner is an artist who uses thin films of oil in his work.

 

 

 

  

 

Vintage Leptothrix discophora


November 3, 2018

This summer and fall have seen far too much rain to produce much in the way of colorful Leptothrix discophora films. But I miss them, so this post delves into photographs I took of this evidence of iron bacteria along Ohio’s Vermilion River between 2008 and 2010, before I’d started the blog. Some of these photos may be repeats of other dives into the archives. I hope that since I can’t remember if I’ve shown them, you can’t either.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Missing the Madison Brass Works


October 24, 2018

In 2008 the Madison Brass Works building was not what many other people would call attractive. Well, you know the rest. I spent considerable time entranced by this window that July. Alas, revisiting the building will not allow my continued enjoyment, at least of this window. This is how the building looks now.

 Here are details of some of the glass blocks:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Crowd of Cones


October 14, 2018

How I ever got started with traffic cones, I don’t know. But I’ve been photographing them for many years. The first photo, below, just happens to have been taken last year outside the Wisconsin State Capitol, whose interior recently made an appearance on this blog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Favorite Drainpipe in Wisconsin


October 4, 2018

My camera has visited this drainpipe and environs for three years running. They haven’t changed much from last year (see the fifth photograph down) except for the displacement of a few bricks and the loss of more white paint. And except for the subsequently missing graffiti sticker (see the sixth and seventh photos down), they didn’t look much different in 2016 either. Well, there’s always next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: