Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Posts tagged “Florida

Fish Bins 58 through 71, and a Story, Part 2


February 21, 2019

The tour Karen Bell gave of the A.P. Bell fish house taught me things about commercial fishing that I’d never even thought to wonder about. Like: The kind of gear on a fishing boat is specific to the species of fish fished. Like: The Bell boats may fish for as long as 14 days before returning to Cortez. Like: The U.S. government knows where all the boats are all the time. Karen treated us to factoids on the history of the company. Like: In the 1920s several families moved to Cortez from a fishing village in Carteret County, North Carolina. The Bells are only one of those families still living in Cortez. Like: A.P. Bell ships fish or roe to Taiwan, Egypt, Italy, France, and Romania as well as Texas, California, New York, Georgia, and restaurants in and around Sarasota.

I’m sad to say that most of the photographs I took inside the fish house did not turn out, but happy to show that two of my photographs of an animated Karen did, as did some of the photos of fish in the cooler. I gladly eat fish, so I’m being something like hypocritical to admit that these beautiful dead animals made me feel sad. Karen’s tour left me with so many questions that I asked if I could come back another day to ask them. She agreed, so this may not be the last of the story about the fish bins.

Two photographs in this post show the bins being used as the fish are offloaded from small boats on trailers. These are boats that ferry the catch from the fishing boats, not those that go to sea. While waiting for the tour to start, I managed to put in some time photographing the bins up close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fish Bins 45 through 57, and a Story


February 11, 2019

I was in Cortez on a Monday, photographing fish bins. Suddenly an authoritative voice in back of me said, “What are you doing?” Uh-oh. I’d never been challenged while walking the fish-house property, but I almost always was there on a Sunday, when workers were not. I turned around to see a woman flanked by two men. I said (cheerily, I hoped), “I’m photographing these fish bins. I don’t know the real name for them, but I—” “We call them vats,” said the woman. “Oh,” I said; “Do you work here?” “Yes, I’m the owner.” Gulp. “Well,” I said, trying to stay cheerful, “I have a photograph of one of these vats at a show in Boston right now. I just love these things.” The woman broke into a grin. “Really? I’m going to Boston in March. Will the show still be up then?” Yes, it would, I assured her. Relief all around. She and her men had wondered if I was documenting something to make trouble, and I had wondered if I would be charged with trespassing.

Now that we were on friendly terms, the woman introduced herself as Karen Bell, the granddaughter of A.P. Bell, who founded the company in the 1920s. Many of the vats have “A. P. Bell” written on them in welding steel, she pointed out (and I have photographed). Karen asked if I knew what the numbers on the sides of the vats mean. (No.) “It’s the weight of the vat. After the fish are offloaded into them, the vats are weighed and the vat weight subtracted to give the weight of the fish.” The fishermen are then paid by the weight of the fish. Later in her office I got Karen’s e-mail address to send her information about the Boston show. She told me she was giving a tour of the fish house in three days to benefit the local museum, and I was welcome to sign up. I did! This story will continue in the next blog post. Here are photos I took that day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hoses in Poses, Continued 5


February 1, 2019

Some of these lines may be cables of some sort rather than hoses, but I don’t have a good rhyme for them. Found all these guys at the marina in Sarasota’s Bayfront Park.

 

 

 


Good Fences Make Good . . .


January 22, 2019

This is the last of the haul that netted the photographs in the previous two posts. The last photograph here is not really a fence but a grate horizontal to the ground. It just seems to fit with the fences. 😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


First Florida Foray of the Season


December 23, 2018

On December 8, shortly after arriving in Sarasota for the winter, I took my first trip to South Lido Park this season. This is perhaps my favorite park in the county, largely because it contains a variety of ecosystems.  The bonus is that it’s only about 15 minutes from home. On my first visit of the season there I always search with apprehension to see if a little stump I’ve named R2D2 is still standing. Every year, I think it has disappeared, only to realize it’s only further down the path. And so it went this year. R2D2 (in the first four photos) seems more colorful than it has been in the past, but that may be my imagination. The fifth photo is probably the first of others you’ll see over the next couple of months showing a dead sabal palm leaf, which I find more graceful in senescence than on the tree. The sixth photograph is another perennial favorite: backlit leaves of the seagrape bush. The last photograph shows my photographing friend Lynda and me.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three Flying Ibises—in Focus!


March 8, 2018

I’m not a bird photographer. I don’t have the requisite long lens to do most birds justice. But I was excited to see these three ibises flying at the Robinson Preserve and thought I’d try following them with my too-short lens. Hah! They’re in focus! The bridge in the background is the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, which connects St. Pete (no one calls it St. Petersburg) to points south. It is a very long bridge—more than four miles end to end—giving travellers plenty of time to contemplate what would happen if another ship crashed into it.


Seagrape Surprise


March 7, 2018

Every year, I’m surprised by the beautiful emerging or senescing leaves of the seagrape. Like fall maple leaves up north, no two are ever alike. I’m never in Florida in late summer, when the trees bear edible fruit.

 

 


Driftwood in Robinson Preserve—5


March 6, 2018


Driftwood in Robinson Preserve—4


March 5, 2018


Driftwood in Robinson Preserve—3


March 4, 2018