Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Posts tagged “reflection

Except When I Do


May 28, 2019

Many of you know that I don’t photograph flowers—except when I do. Two photographs of flowers play bookends here to the rest of my haul from walking in Schoepfle Garden a week ago Saturday. In between are lichens on a low retaining wall and some favorite trees along the Vermilion River. Elsewhere in the park, I wasn’t surprised to see this stump; the tree had been visibly ailing. But I was surprised that someone had painted the edges of the stump with orange paint. Drawing closer, however, I saw that it wasn’t orange paint but a bright-orange fungus. None of my photographs of the fungus up close came out. I wonder if the brightness could have thrown off my camera’s focussing ability. Had I done more chimping, I might have noticed that the fungus was not in focus. Maybe I would even have thought to try manual focus. At least the section of the stump that is spalted turned out. The next photograph is in monotone because it was too confusing in color. Moving in, thus cutting down on the number of elements in the frame, the subject could handle color. I found some Leptothrix discophora along the river, but we’ve had so much rain that it was quite young (previous films having been washed down toward Lake Erie) and probably is all gone by now. Even though this film is very young, you know you’re looking at L. discophora when the water reflects the surrounding foliage so brilliantly. The opening flower photograph is of dogwood, but I don’t know the name of the closing flower. Maybe one or more of you do. The last image is a crop of the previous one. Click on it to see it larger.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Revisiting Table Rock


May 22, 2019

Last April I posted three photographs of a rock I see whenever I go to the Schoepfle Garden. In the Comments, Alan Goldsmith asked if I’d thought of photographing the rock from the same place every time. I confess that I’d only been trying to find the most interesting composition each time. But his comment lodged in my brain, and I have since tried to stick with the same view or two when I visit. So here are two photographs I took of the rock Saturday. Following those are some photos I’d taken of the rock from the same vantage points on June 2 and July 14, 2018.

Shortly after posting photos of this rock last April, I named the rock Table Rock. Now I can keyword this specific rock in Lightroom and call up its photos easily. But there’s another advantage in naming features in the landscape. For me, attaching words increases the intimacy I feel with the named thing. I can’t say why this is so. Perhaps some of you have some relevant ideas.

 

 

 

 


A Walk along Myakkahatchee Creek


April 21, 2019

This collection of photographs begins, in a way, where the last post left off: with trees of life. The plants growing on these trees seem a little different from the ones shown in the last post—perhaps because they immediately border the water. Two photographs separate the trees of life from reflections in the creek: one I think of as essence of tiger—a small stream on its way to the creek—and an arrangement of dead leaves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hoses in Poses, Continued 5


February 1, 2019

Some of these lines may be cables of some sort rather than hoses, but I don’t have a good rhyme for them. Found all these guys at the marina in Sarasota’s Bayfront Park.

 

 

 


If You Go to Boston . . .


December 10, 2018

Because of the kindness of three people, I am privileged (along with 61 other photographers) to be exhibiting a photograph in the Passageway of the Lafayette City Center in Boston. The Passageway links Macy’s with the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The show, Abstraction Attraction, is up now through May 5, 2019. Note that you can see all the photographs online. If you happen to be in the Passageway during this time and see my photo, please let me know! The photographs were selected by Paula Tognarelli, executive director and curator of the Griffin Museum of Photography. Here’s the chosen photo, The Fish Bins of Cortez 38, and a link to other fish-bin photos. Big thanks to Stephen Tomasko, who sent me the entry information, and to my friends Katie Brown and Robert Taylor, who prompted Stephen by telling him that I “was a photographer, too.”


Missing the Madison Brass Works


October 24, 2018

In 2008 the Madison Brass Works building was not what many other people would call attractive. Well, you know the rest. I spent considerable time entranced by this window that July. Alas, revisiting the building will not allow my continued enjoyment, at least of this window. This is how the building looks now.

 Here are details of some of the glass blocks:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Farmhouse 1


August 19, 2018

Some of you will remember the photographs of the Pennsylvania farmhouse windows taken last year. (See here and here and here.) Last year my best intentions to take many photographs inside the house were thwarted by my wish instead to socialize and play at other things. This year I was a bit more disciplined but, I think, not to the real detriment of playing games and schmoozing. Here’s the beginning of this year’s harvest of Pennsylvania farmhouse photographs.


Remnants of Winter; Harbingers of Spring 10


April 7, 2018

Although the temperature in the area never rose above 36 degrees Fahrenheit March 4, the sun was out, dislodging snow and ice from tree branches overhanging the Back Pond.


Remnants of Winter; Harbingers of Spring 9


April 6, 2018

By the time you see this post, spring may have appeared in full in northeast Ohio, but this blog will linger on the transition from winter for a while longer. While the photographs in the previous eight posts were taken in Oberlin (on March 10), the rest of this series features photos taken in Schoepfle Garden. I always make my way down to the Vermilion River by way of the Back Pond. Here’s how the pond looked March 4.


A Car for Linda? 4


September 5, 2017

I may be confusing people. This is not my car, nor are the cars in any post with the title “A Car for Linda?” It is a photograph of a car (and a reflection) like photographs of cars that I take. Earlier photographs of cars that I posted—the ones, called “A Car for Ken”—were like photographs of cars that a fellow blogger named Ken takes. (Keep scrolling on his site; you’ll find some.) Ken avoids reflections in cars; I seek them.