Linda Grashoff's Photography Adventures

Latest

Playing with the October Landscape at Schoepfle Garden


November 10, 2019

Fall color was past its prime by the time I got out to Schoepfle Garden October 29. Still, some lovely remnants remained. Besides photographing them as is, I played around with intentional camera movement (ICM) again. That I took the fourth photo here is thanks to Steve Schwartzman, who asked in the comments section of the last post, “In any of these, did you zoom your lens while you moved the camera?” I had not, but at Steve’s prompt, I tried it on this trip. Will try it again. What fun.

1

2

3

4a

4b

5

6

7

8

9

Playing with the Wisconsin Landscape


October 27, 2019

To close out the photographs taken in Wisconsin this summer, here are four experiments in intentional camera movement (ICM). That is, the first four are Wisconsin; the others, from the archives, are Ohio and Florida.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

A Few Garden Finds


October 21, 2019

Here are a few photographs taken in August at the Olbrich Botanical Garden in Madison, Wisconsin.

1 The red splashes are cardinal flowers, Lobelia cardinalis.

2 Here is a birch—I don’t presume to know which one.

3 Here’s another birch, overlooking two inviting chairs.

4 I’m not sure why I’m drawn to empty chairs. Maybe they represent possibilities . . .

5

6

7

Garver Feed Mill—Renaissance and Memory


October 6, 2019

Twelve years ago during a walk to find photographs in Madison, Wisconsin, where I was visiting, I passed what looked like an abandoned building. On it was painted the name Garver. I have a friend whose last name is Garver, so of course I took a snapshot to show her. This summer my daughter and daughter-in-law treated me to a return visit to the building—vacant for two decades before renovation began in 2017. They didn’t know I had photographed it in 2007 but thought I would find the Garver Feed Mill interesting. (They are great scouts!) This time I photographed in earnest,  trying hard not to wish I had been witness to many more of the building’s iterations. A plaque outside one of the doors gave information about the building, and putting this post together I learned more. I find it interesting that the Wisconsin State Capitol and the Garver Feed Mill were completed in the same year. And it’s fun to see that remnants of old graffiti add an artistic touch to the cleaned masonry. I like buildings that hold visual evidence of their past; this one also included bricked-in doorways and windows, patched walls, sheared-off I-beams, and what must be gouges from former industrial activity. If you’d like to know more about the Garver Feed Mill, don’t miss the Wisconsin State Journal article that features photographs taken through the years, going back to 1924. Also of interest are an article in the Wisconsin State Farmer and two links on a City of Madison web page: the Garver Final Report and a presentation by the restoration architects.

1 This is the photograph I took in 2007.

2 This is the photograph I took of the same wall this August.

3

This is steel (I think) cladding on a newer part of the facade. The next two photographs are from nearby sections of the wall.

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 I learned from my reading that the white bricks indicate water damage.

12 Were these patches on an interior wall made lately or in older times? My guess is older times.

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 Even the new women’s room’s concrete floor has artistic appeal.

21

The Wisconsin State Capitol, Revisited


September 24, 2019

Last year I posted photographs of the Wisconsin State Capitol building, dividing the photos over two days. Returning to Madison this August, I was again enthralled with the beauty and majesty of this edifice. Some friends say they are made uncomfortable by the richness of this structure and think about how taxpayers were made to fund its original construction as well as its renovation. I see their point, but I’m still seduced. I ease my guilty pleasure with the thought that all this magnificence belongs to the people of Wisconsin. That has to count for something. I am loading this blog post with 21 photographs. Don’t feel you have to look at them all. I will tell you, though, that the last one is pretty cute. For those of you not familiar with such things as official state animals in the U.S., I’ll point out that the creature depicted is a badger.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

August on the Vermilion River, 2019 Version


September 16, 2019

Leptothrix discophora was in splender when I drove out to the Schoepfle Garden August 11. I didn’t see huge patches of it, but enough medium-size patches to satisfy me. The handiwork of L. discophora and other iron bacteria was also in evidence as great gushy trails down to the water. Along my walk I dallied over some rocks I considered first among equals. Number 9 is mudstone that held some kind of salts that left pits as they washed out in the river.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

The Farmhouse Grounds in 2019


August 25, 2019

While I love photographing inside my friend’s farmhouse, the grounds are likewise appealing. One of the traditions for farmhouse owners and guests is going out after dinner to watch the sun set over the fields and trees. As I was walking to the viewing spot, I turned around and saw where the late-day sun had flung warm patches of light into the darkening woods. While I was at the farm, the sunsets were modest, but the shared experience of anticipating, then viewing them brought joy nonetheless. Photograph #6 is of the threshold to the viewing spot, proving that you don’t need a sunset to appreciate the view, even if it is obscured by trees. The next two photographs prove that you don’t need clear skies and copious sunshine to photograph the outdoors. This grouping ends with my find on the property of some of my favorite things: hoses. You can do a search of this blog on hoses if you like; you’ll get more hits than you might imagine.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

The Farmhouse in 2019—3


August 18, 2019

Could I see anything new in my fourth visit to my friend’s Pennsylvania farmhouse? I won’t say this was a worry, but it was a wonder. Earlier views of the farmhouse interior begin here and here and here. I guess I needn’t have wondered.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Ohiopyle Falls Revisited


August 4, 2019

Two years ago, during a visit to my friend’s farmstead in southwestern Pennsylvania, we took a short trip to the Ohiopyle State Park, where the Youghiogheny River leaps over rocks, forming the Ohiopyle Falls. Here’s some context, photographed in 2017. The river was just as exciting last month, when I took myriad pictures of its rushing water. I’ve winnowed them down for you. And as thrilling as the river is, so—in a far quieter way—are the still pools of water captured by depressions in the rock banks. My personal pleasure was finding Leptothrix discophora on the foot trail.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Cucumber Falls 6


July 28, 2019

Last week I spent another glorious time at my friend’s farmstead in Pennsylvania. Repeating what we had done in previous years, we went on two outings to the Youghiogheny River—to Cucumber Falls one day and Ohiopyle Falls another. Looking at last year’s photos of Cucumber Falls, I see that the same views appealed to me this year. Rather than post nearly exact repetitions, I refer you to this and this and this and this and this post from 2018. Below are some photographs of and around Cucumber Falls that don’t repeat last year’s catch, at least not much.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

%d bloggers like this: